Steve Jobs - Review

Steve Jobs is a masterwork of the 21st century, and will likely be cited for decades as one of the greatest depictions of the brilliant co-founder of Apple ever. Michael Fassbender gives a riveting performance as Jobs, and the brilliant writing from Aaron Sorkin never lets up.

Plot

Steve Jobs is based on the best selling biography by Walter Isaacson, and follows three separate years in Job's life, with flashbacks thrown in here and there. The entire film takes place before three different product launches that sank, avenged, and re-branded Steve Job's career. It should be said that there is absolutely no exposition on how Apple started, as the film starts at the launch of the Macintosh. If you plan on seeing this movie, you may want to read up on the early history of Apple. The film does an incredible job showing the massive stress Jobs went under right before giving a presentation. Aaron Sorkin has already established himself as one of the 21st centuries greatest screen writers, and that fact is extremely prevalent in Steve Jobs. The script feels like air. It's all around you, and it requires you to live and breathe it in order to experience the film at its best.

Performances

Michael Fassbender gives a career defining performance as Steve Jobs, perfectly balancing sarcastic wit with cold hard wrath. Kate Winslet also gives a powerful performance as Joanna Hoffman, and I mean literally powerful. Herself being one of the only people to stand up to Steve, she shows her poise and strength in every scene. Steve's daughter in particular stands out, as an afterthought for Steve in her younger years, but later a large part of his life when she is older. She maintains her same views on Steve, carefully sidestepping the common problem of troubled parent/child relationship inconsistency.

Style

Director Danny Boyle (Slumdog Millionaire, 127 Hours) takes a different stance on the incredible story of Steve Jobs, opting to take a more theatrical approach. Each major scene ends with Steve going out into the audience for a presentation, giving a certain theatrical intensity to each scene. This is a film with a lot of artistic flare, but if you blink you'll miss it.

Summary

Steve Jobs is the Steve Jobs movie that needed to be made, completely erasing 2013's mediocre Jobs. The films R rating goes a long way to bring the realism of the man to life, without ever exaggerating events to make them more entertaining. Steve Jobs is a masterpiece.

Pros- Fassbender, cast, artistic style, theatric tone

Cons- Very confusing without knowledge of Apple history